Work At Home Institute

Scam Risk is here to help you protect yourself and fight back
By: Scam Risk - Expert Reviewer

Work At Home Institute

We’re going to review multiple aspects of Work At Home Institute to decide if it really is the best online training course out there.

We’ll talk about whether Work At Home Institute is the right lead generation tool for you.

At the end, I’ll answer some of the most frequently asked questions regarding Work At Home Institute and lead generation online training course in general.

And most important, I’ll show you the exact system I used to build my own internet marketing business to over $50,000 a month in mostly passive income.

This system made me swear off high ticket sales for good, because it uses some of the same skills in a much more powerful and profitable way!

At A Glance

Product Name: Work At Home Institute

Owner: Bobbie Robinson

Price: $97

Rating: Scam

Check Out This Simple Way To Run A Digital Real Estate Empire Online
With no:
This is so simple, it should be illegal.

Table of Contents

What Is The Work At Home Institute?

Bobbie Robinson founded the Work At Home Institute in 2012.  The platform is saying that you would be typing advertisements online, that earning money is simple, and that you can begin making money as soon as you sign up.   They also say that no prior experience or qualification is necessary. 

Work At Home Institute Review: What's Inside WAH Institute

One of the offshoot shell programs I’ve reviewed recently is Work At Home Institute or WAH Institute. The program was designed to get from their subscribers until their pockets have run dry.

Hence, I rated the Work At Home Institute as a fraud due to the questionable market techniques they use to promote the WAH Institute.

The use of exorbitant revenue-generating opportunities and faked newscast images is puzzling.

As my research exposes one by one WAH Institute’s fraud, it becomes apparent that a program like the Work At Home Institute will resort to deceptive sales strategies with their seemingly credible teaching methods.

Work At Home Institute does include some guidance in the form of a video series, but like any scam, this is just a ruse to circumvent any legal repercussions that could result from taking people’s money and not giving them what they pay for in return .

The entire Work At Home Institute seems to have been planned to direct you to other products where they can defraud you more.

Here’s How The Work At Home Institute Scam Works!

This is how I believe the whole scheme works. At least three programs are usually intertwined in a scam and work with and for another.

According to what I’ve heard from reviewing a few related schemes, the three main players are Home Home Job Institute, Profits System, and, of course, Work at Home Institute.

As you will soon learn, all of the previously described services have striking parallels!

What precisely are you doing to earn such a sizeable income?

From Unemployed Single Mother To Millionaire

In 2013, Work at Home Institute (WAHI) was launched and has since then claimed that the program can generate for you a “sizable income” from home.

First off, you’ll learn about Bobbie Robinson, a single mother who worked “very hard” before being laid off. Fortunately, her daughter encouraged her to persevere, and “soon after the nightmare started, I found the internet.”

So, this Bobbie met a guy who was working from home and shared with her how he was able to work part-time and yet make a good living.

Bobbie applied to the same site where the guy worked at, and three months after, “I now have a simple work at home career that takes me only 4 hours or less a day to accomplish.” Most of all, “I make millions every year. I can do anything I want, go on long holidays, and give my daughter the life she has always deserved.”

What exactly is this wonderful work from home career that earns Bobbie millions of dollars a year for part-time work?

The ‘Big Secret’ Is Link Posting.

Unsurprisingly, large corporations do not have the resources to recruit new staff to post online links for them, so the job is outsourced instead.

How exactly does link posting help you earn money? WAHI explains it this way:

  1. You copy the link codes provided to you by WAHI after logging in your account.
  2. You navigate to a section of your account where you can add “customer records” and paste your copied links.
  3. You complete a “few simple details” in a form and post your links.
  4. You then check how much you’re making from your affiliate ties.

WAHI’s sales page then tells you how much a “typical account” earns in a week:

Patricia Feeney, another mom who works at home, is featured on the WAHI sales page as additional “testimony.” According to WAHI, this initiative has attracted national media coverage.

However, nothing about the WAHI program is stated in the report. The video clip is also extensively filtered and mostly presents the idea of working from home in general.

Similarly, the WAHI attempts to pretend it’s the focus of big news of major networks such as these:

Many work-at-home opportunity pages can use this trick to make you believe they are legitimate.

The pages that have been highlighted in the news, on the other hand, provided a link or article to that news network. Imagine 

You can’t press on the news network pages from the WAHI sales page, so you have no means of double checking what was published.

How Much Money Can You Make?

They claim that you can earn anywhere between $300 per week and $6000 per month. Really? Just by  typing advertisements? I’m curious why more people don’t just type advertisements for a living.

Deceptive Advertising Is All In A Days Business

 Edited generic claims, fabricated newscasts, fake testimonials, and counterfeit one-on-one mentoring are all part of the three scams out to steal your money.

They would go at such great length to fool you, and if you fall for it, you’re in serious trouble.

Consider this: $47-$97 one-time fees compounded by a minimum of 30,000 – 50,000 customers for all three scams equals some very rich scammers.

This bogus press release appears in both the Work At Home Institute and the Home Profit System scams. Fake certificates of approval and advertisements on popular news networks are used to fake credibility.

Will The Real Bobbie Robinson Please Stand Up!

One of these pictures appears in an advertisement for the Home Job Institute, and the other appears in an advertisement for the Work At Home Institute.

The Home Profits System says this is Mary Johnson, and the Work At Home Institute also claims that the same lady is Bobbie Robinson, the program’s founder.

The fact that they would resort to this kind of promotional fraud is justification enough to avoid this organization!

 So, what else is it that makes me suspicious of WAHI? Let me count the ways.

The Customer Photos Are Fake.

WAHI displays images of buyers, as well as fantastic reviews, along the right side of the sales page. Here are a few examples of customers:

When you Google search these people, you’d soon discover that these are all stock images!

The Program Availability Is Fake.

The WAHI promotional page does what many fraudulent initiatives do to get you to join: it establishes a false service availability for your local area. Irrespective of where you reside or if you enter a fictitious zip code into the form, there will always be only three positions available in your area:

No matter how many times you refresh this tab, these three positions will never be reduced to zero.

I do need to mention that another pre-programmed aspect of this system is the automatic price reduction when you attempt to exit the sales page. The cost of the program is reduced from $97 to $77 and then to $47. This occurs regardless of how many times you abandon or return to the page.

Bobbie Robinson Is Fake.

The sales page depicts the program’s spokeswoman as a young 20ish year old woman in front of her laptop.

But an image check reveals that she also goes by the nickname, Michelle Withrow of Stay at Home Revenue and Work at Home University, among many other scammy work-at-home programs.

And what about that of Bobbie and Michelle? It is, in reality, a stock image.

Link Posting Isn’t Exactly How Affiliates Make Money.

WAHI wants to persuade you that you can earn a sizeable income by posting a mere number of links per day and making huge referral fees as people click on and purchase goods from those links.

Although link posting is one method by which affiliate marketers generate money, it’s just part of a much bigger system. Authentic affiliate marketing entails creating blogs with high-quality content, emailing followers, blogging, developing insightful items, writing product reviews, and so on.

It has the potential to make money, but not by simply posting links, as Bobbie says.

WAHI Offers No Real People Who Back Up Their Claims.

WAHI’s contact information consists of a standardized 877 phone number that connects to an outsourced customer service line.

You have no means of approaching the program’s real creators, because, as previously said, the spokeswoman herself is a sham.

If you encounter any difficulties when participating in the WAHI scheme, you are on your own.

The WAHI system has very general info about who may be available to assist you.

When you sign up for the service, you are supposed to be paired with a “Internet specialist.”

But it just doesn’t make sense as to why they would provide an Internet specialist rather than someone skilled in affiliate marketing.

You also reportedly obtain entry to a WAHI members-only area called Startup Freedom Club.

There is no indication of how many people are part of this club, or whether either of the program’s founders assist those who may have questions. 

A club is pretty worthless if the members are clueless on how to get started with affiliate marketing.

Additional Up-Sells And Fees

The introductory and one-time sign-up fee is $97.00. However, it appears that there are additional undisclosed payments. One of the charges you will be billed is a deposit for “training meetings.” The sum for the down payment alone was $2,400.00!  That’s right, a whopping $2.4K!  

Didn’t they mention that no prior experience or qualification is required? So, what’s the deal with the upsell of this training? Why is it so expensive? 

I’m pretty sure you’re getting what I’m trying to say here.

What Do These Scammers Want?

What the Home Jobs Institute, Online Profits System, and the Work At Home Institute, intend to do is to get your money to get started, which appears in the form of an introductory registration fee ranging from $47 to $97, and they also want to obtain as much personal details as they can from you!

Among these con artists, confidential knowledge is worth more or less than hard cash. Your confidential details will be sold repeatedly to corporations of all kinds, both good and bad!

My Final Thoughts: Is It A Scam?

In my most honest opinion, you should avoid products such as the Work At Home Institute, Home Jobs Institute, and Online Profits System.

These services all include a one-time purchase entry fee and are supported by a 30- or 60-day money-back guarantee, which is a ruse. Of course, you will not get your money back once you’ve fallen for it!

Keep in mind that any program or make money online scheme that offers a one-time low price rather than a monthly subscription has no duty to have any customer support for their product, while a monthly plan has interest in keeping you in their program.

This, for the most part, will constantly be searching for opportunities to maximize retention, so their offerings should evolve on a regular basis.

I have been reviewing products and services for many years. When I do a review, I look at the three main components that are required to create a profitable online business:

  1. The online presence you establish: What kind of presence is the platform assisting you in creating? Usually, you will be provided any of the following: website, storefront, or blog.
  2. The training you are receiving:  What is the next move after having built an online presence? Is there a detailed instruction on how to do it?
  3. The assistance being given to you:  How much can the product maker support you in growing your business, and is there a group to which you can turn for advice?

If you want to be genuinely successful online, you must have a mixture of those three elements.

Work at Home Institute fails to meet all of the three criteria. You are not establishing a legit online presence, the training is deceptive, and there is no guidance or customer care provided. Sadly,  extort as much money as possible from you is the only thing that’s gonna happen here.

Don’t be taken under by this one.

It is entirely possible to build a profitable, successful online business easier without Work At Home Institute, however.

My #1 pick proves this. And unlike Work At Home Institute, it actually provides real proof of real success from real people as recently as a few days ago.

What Is Our Top Recommendation For Making Money Online In 2021?

Our review team has come across a program in the real estate industry that is next level!

Although it’s not real estate in the traditional sense, it’s all digital.

Yup, Digital Real Estate!

Where Work At Home Institute falls short is in scalability. 

You can’t realistically expect to be able to set up a bunch of different Affiliate Marketing blogs and get NATIONAL traffic to them.

It just takes too many resources (money included) for any regular person to bootstrap.

But what if you could make even more money off of little local websites without having to spend tens of thousands to set up an affiliate blog?

With this digital real estate program, you can profit off LOCAL traffic to your website every single day!

Sound too good to be true? Of course it does! But it isn’t…in fact, business owners wish they had this skill!

All you have to do is build and rank a LOCAL website and forward the jobs off to a business owner in town, you could even email it to them!

This works for literally any service based business, tree service, plumbing, towing, etc. 

How do you get paid and how much?

Simple, after you forward the jobs off to a business owner and he makes some money off of them, you simply ask to make the deal beneficial for each other.

A fair price to charge per lead, depending on the industry is 10-20%…let’s just use the tree service industry for example and go by worst case scenario.

Let’s say you build and rank the site and only 10 jobs a month come in. The average tree service job is anywhere from $500-$2000!

That means at bare minimum you have an asset worth $500 a month!

See why they call it digital real estate now? That’s a rent payment. 

The great thing is how easy it is to scale. You don’t have to worry about spending boatloads of money on a single traffic source to get CRUMBS in affiliate income.

Remember Work At Home Institute  talking about their little commissions off link posting? 

This one actually allows you to collect HUGE FLAT RATE DEALS. Truly passive income!

The training program takes making money online to a whole other level. The owner of the program walks you through how to build and rank a site hand in hand, with the occasional voice over when he is sharing his screen.

You will learn the importance of keywords, website name, how to send call notifications via email, backlinking, etc.

Once the training program is completed you will also have access to a Facebook group much better than the Work At Home Institute group in our opinion. This group is much more active.

Unlike Work At Home Institute, where you’re getting maybe $5 per sale, you could be getting 10-20X THAT. 

A business will always want more leads and another job. In fact it doesn’t even matter that the job isn’t coming from their website name…they see it as it is…expanding digital real estate.

Unlike Work At Home Institute, more people have been able to walk away from their 9-5 job as well. 

Now, I know you probably have tons of questions… So, check this out to learn more.

Share This Article:
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
ScamRisk's #1 Online
Business Recommendation:
You know deep down what you're meant for. Now they will show you how to go get it.
>

Be first in line to read all the new Scam Risk Reports as they're published!

Select the categories that interest you the most

We don't share your information with any 3rd parties and we will never spam you.

ScamRisk.com

Fact Checking Standards

To ensure the highest level of accuracy and the most recent up to date information Scam Risk is regularly audited and fact check by following very strict guidelines. All the content on Scam Risk meets the following criteria.

We use the highest level of authority sources such as: FTC (Federal Trade Commission), ICPEN (International Consumer Protection and Enforcement Network), Academic Associations & Journals are used for research reference while creating this content.

Feel free to contact us if you feel this data is incomplete or questionable.

Report A Scam